Playoff Champion Ohio State Visits The White House

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It’s been quite a whirlwind 48-hour stretch for Buckeye football. Just two days after drawing more than 99,000 to its spring game — far and away the most of any college football program — Ohio State visits the White House on Monday.

Pres. Obama joked about the Buckeye faithful packing in Ohio Stadium, saying: “It’s safe to say, when you get 100,000 fans to a practice, your fans are a little crazy.”

This little nod to star defensive end Joey Bosa was also a nice touch from Pres. Obama:

The first College Football Playoff champions having the opportunity to visit this particular POTUS is fitting, because Pres. Obama pushed for a reformed college football postseason upon his election.

In November 2008, he said:

“I’m fed up with these computer rankings and this that and the other. Get eight teams — the top eight teams right at the end. You got a playoff. Decide on a national champion.”

It may not be eight teams, but we have a playoff. And, as Urban Meyer noted in his speech, Ohio State was the last of the four teams invited to the inaugural tournament, which made for a nice, little twist.

Coincidentally, calls for a playoff reached a fever pitch the same year Pres. Obama was elected, in part due to one of Meyer’s former programs, Utah. After the Utes finished the season as college football’s sole unbeaten, their then-home conference — the Mountain West — began the charge for a reformed postseason.

In another coincidence, Meyer’s 2008 Florida Gators were the first team in any sport to visit the White House after Pres. Obama’s inauguration. In an interview with Sports Illustrated, Meyer spoke highly of meeting both Pres. George W. Bush — which his 2006 Florida team did in 2007 — as well as Pres. Obama.

Perhaps we could use Meyer’s non-partisanship to get Congress to work together. Meyer has already proven capable of doing the unexpected, after all, leading a Big Ten team to a national championship at the expense of SEC heavyweight Alabama.

Meyer won’t be tackling gridlock on Capitol Hill anytime soon. He’s more focused on repeating as national champions, which means keeping the Buckeyes grounded amid things like 100,000-spectator scrimmages and visits to the White House.